Party in the Holler Concert

  • September 3, 2016

    Tackle America's best whitewater by day and party on the mountain all night. Party in the Holler with Yonder Mountain String Band, The Larry Keel Experience, Town Mountain & The Josh Daniel/Mark Schimick Project. Get ready to stomp your feet so hard that your legs will be sore for days. We have big plans and some super surprises planned so make your plans now to Party in the Holler September 3rd!

    Concert Ticket - $50 Advance/$60 Day of Show

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    All Mountain Pass - $60 Advance/$75 Day of Show

    Includes:

    • Concert ticket
    • Saturday night camping/parking
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    Adventure Pass - $180 Advance/$200 Day of Show

    Includes:

      • Concert ticket
      • Two nights camping/parking (Fri/Sat)
      • Saturday Wonderland Waterpark 1/2 Day Pass
      • Choose an Adventure Activity

    Adventure Pass (includes Zip Lining)

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    Adventure Pass (includes Mountain Biking)

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    Adventure Pass (includes SUPing)

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    Adventure Pass (includes Lake Kayak Tour)

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    Adventure Pass (includes Rock Climbing)

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    Town Mountain's Whitewater Rafting Trip

    Ready for an adventure? Jump onto a whitewater rafting trip down the Lower New River with Town Mountain. These guys can't wait to hit the river with you and paddle miles of world class whitewater in the West Virginia mountains. This section of river is perfect for beginners while still being exciting for veteran rafters as there is a guide in every boat to steer you to the steep drops and giant waves. Splash in the sunshine all afternoon and at night party under the stars with your favorite band and new friends. The minimum age for this trip is 12 years old and advance reservations are required. 

    16' Raft Trip With Town Mountain
    Adult: $144/Youth $134

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    14' Boat Adventure Upgrade 
    The smaller the boat the bigger the waves and the ride!!
    Adult: $149/Youth $139

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    Thanks to our sponsors
      Coca-Cola

     

     

  • The Wood Brothers

    Chris Wood had a scrap of a song — seemed like a chorus — scribbled in a notebook. He played it for his older brother, Oliver, who’d had a verse lying around he didn’t know what to do with. The two pieces, composed months apart, one in urban Atlanta and the other deep in the Catskills, dovetailed musically and lyrically: the verse about a man regretting chasing unattainable women, the high-lonesome, harmony-driven refrain of “When I die, I wanna be sent back to try, try again.”

    “Neon Tombstone” wasn’t the first song that Chris, a founding member of jazz trio Medeski Martin & Wood, and Oliver, formerly Tinsley Ellis’s guitarist, had written — since 2006, they’d released three studio albums of Americana as The Wood Brothers. But it was the first one they’d written like this. “This is how a song is supposed to come together,” Oliver remembers thinking. “There was some chance, some randomness, to it.”

    The experience marked a deeper level of collaboration for The Wood Brothers, a newfound fraternal synchronicity that’s captured on their latest album, ‘The Muse.’ Within the first few bars of opener “Wastin’ My Mind,” which could pass for a lost cut from “The Last Waltz,” it’s clear the brothers are operating on a different plane than when we last heard them, on 2011’s 'Smoke Ring Halo.' The components are similar: the dialed-in vocal harmonies, Oliver’s gritty acoustic guitar, Chris’s virtuosic upright bass, the warrior poet lyrics. But here there’s a glue — a yellowy carpenter’s glue, one imagines — holding it all together. The cohesion comes from the brothers having spent the last two years on the road with new full-time member Jano Rix, a drummer and ace-in-the-hole multi-instrumentalist, whereas they relied on session musician-friends to fill out previous albums. Jano’s additional harmonies give credence to the old trope that while two family members often harmonize preternaturally, it takes a third, non-related singer for the sound to really shine. And then there’s Jano's work on his literally patented percussion instrument, the “shuitar,” a shitty acoustic guitar rigged up with tuna cans and other noisemakers, which, in his hands, becomes a veritable drum kit.

    Starting with debut ‘Ways Not To Lose,’ which NPR described as a collection of “gracious little songs [that] sound like they were born on a front porch during a beautiful sunset,” The Wood Brothers have made albums like you’re not supposed to anymore — recording mostly live, warts and all. But on ‘The Muse,’ they double down on the production values of a purer time. Whereas 'Smoke Ring Halo' was tracked with the musicians playing in separate rooms, here Chris, Oliver and Jano often circled around a tree of microphones, a couple feet apart from one another, and simply played the songs, with even the lead vocals being recorded on the spot. The arrangement is a producer’s nightmare — the different sounds bleed into the various mics, limiting mixing options and ruling out the possibility of fixing mistakes — but the band had two willing accomplices: legendary country musician Buddy Miller, who produced the album, and Nashville studio vet Mike Poole, who engineered.

    “I just love how Mike and Buddy really embraced that idea,” Oliver says. Miller, an award-winning producer, guitarist and solo artist, has performed and recorded with icons such as Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Lucinda Williams, Robert Plant and Alison Krauss. Oliver continues, “I hear little things that are out of tune or imperfect, and I love it. That’s what I like about old recordings – they just did it, and that’s what happened.”

    From early in their childhood in Boulder, CO., Chris and Oliver were steeped in American roots music. Their father, a molecular biologist, would perform classic songs at campfires and family gatherings, while their mother, a poet, instilled a passion for storytelling and turn of phrase. The brothers bonded over bluesmen like Jimmy Reed and Lightnin’ Hopkins, but their paths, musical and otherwise, would diverge. Oliver moved to Atlanta, where he played guitar in cover bands before earning a spot in Tinsley Ellis’s touring act. At Ellis’s behest, Oliver began to sing and then founded King Johnson, a hard-touring group that would release six albums of blues-inflected R&B, funk and country over the next 12 years. Chris, meanwhile, studied jazz bass at the New England Conservatory of Music, moved to New York City and, in the early ‘90s, formed Medeski Martin & Wood, which over the next two decades would become a cornerstone of contemporary jazz and abstract music.

    After pursuing separate musical careers for some 15 years, the brothers performed together at a show in North Carolina: Oliver sat in with MM&W following King Johnson’s opening set. "I realized we should be playing music together," Chris recalls. Soon after, the pair recorded a batch of Oliver’s songs, channeling the shared musical heroes of their youth while seizing on their own individual strengths — Oliver’s classic songwriting, Chris’s forward-thinking musicianship. A demo landed them a record deal with Blue Note, who released ‘Ways Not To Lose’ in 2006. Follow-up ‘Loaded’ came in 2008; after covers EP ‘Up Above My Head’ the next year, the band moved to Zac Brown’s Southern Ground Artists for ‘Smoke Ring Halo’ and then 2012’s ‘Live, Volume One: Sky High’ and ‘Live, Volume Two: Nail and Tooth.’

    On ‘The Muse,’ following the opening one-two of “Wastin’ My Mind” and “Neon Tombstone,” the album shuffles between bluesy, classic country and swampy funk, mining the brothers’ timeless influences (Robert Johnson, Willie Nelson, Charles Mingus) while sounding fresh enough to win over fans of today’s mainstream roots-music acts (The Avett Brothers, Mumford & Sons). The title track shows Oliver’s songwriting at its most tender and autobiographical to date, as he sings of his “finest work yet” — his newborn child — in his endearingly offbeat voice, which The New York Times calls “gripping.” Chris takes the vocal lead on “Sweet Maria” and “Losin’,” and capably so, while on his standup bass, he’s often playful, even rascally, imbuing the songs with humor with his warm, unpredictable notes. Jano, when not banging on his shuitar, adds refreshing flourishes of piano and melodica.

    'The Muse' marks another milestone for The Wood Brothers: it's the first full-length they've recorded at Southern Ground Studios in Nashville. In the way that Manhattan becomes its own character in an old Woody Allen movie, the live room at Southern Ground plays a key role on the album, making its warm presence felt throughout. (There’s even a little hiss from the analog tape machine.) The choice of location was practical, given Nashville's rich history and network of musicians, but also symbolic: The Wood Brothers are now officially a Nashville-based band, with Oliver having relocated in 2012, and Chris recently following. It’s the first time the brothers have lived in the same city since they left their parents’ nest; both are eager, along with Nashville local Jano, to plumb the sense of collaboration they tapped into during the fateful “Neon Tombstone” writing session. As Oliver says of ‘The Muse,' “This is the first record that really feels like a band record. It’s taken years for us to really feel like we can collaborate, and I think this is the pinnacle of it so far.”

    The Wood Brothers Official Website


     

    The SteelDrivers

    The Steeldriver Boat WaterRight there, at two minutes and ten seconds into the first song, “Long Way Down.” The part where Gary Nichols sings, “Girl, we both know where your soul is bound.” Only he bleeds it as much as he sings it. He sounds murderous, maniacal. Her soul is bound for nothing skyward, for nothing heavenly. And he’s fine with that.
    Richard Bailey’s banjo plays funky, little Kentucky-goes-to-Memphis rolls. Tammy Rogers’ fiddle soars. Brent Truitt’s mandolin chops time, and Mike Fleming’s bass pounds the downbeat. And all that is righteous and right-on. Elevated, even. But Nichols—he lets loose something the opposite of righteousness. It’s a howl, full of hurt and anger and life. Starts on the highest E note that 99.9% of male singers can hit, then ascends into a sweet falsetto, and then opens up like the gates of Hell, into a reeling screech.“That made me dizzy for a second,” Nichols says, remembering the moment he sang the line. “Really, I almost passed out. There are certain lines in SteelDrivers songs that require a little bit of Wilson Pickett.”
    Nichols knows about Wilson Pickett, who recorded “Mustang Sally” at FAME studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, less than three miles from Jimmy Nutt’s NuttHouse, where the SteelDrivers recorded these Muscle Shoals Recordings. Nichols is from Muscle Shoals. He grew up as a guitar slinger and a soul shouter, which should not be any help in fronting one of bluegrass music’s most engaging outfits. But part of the reason the SteelDrivers are such an engaging band is the seemingly incongruous blend of soul and slink, blues and country, mountain coal and red dirt. “I think that’s what moves people when they come to see us: the realness and rawness and edge,” says Rogers, who formed the SteelDrivers in 2005 with Bailey, Fleming, multi-instrumentalist Mike Henderson, and soulful singer (and now-acclaimed contemporary country artist) Chris Stapleton. That version of the SteelDrivers received three GRAMMY® nominations and won an audience that was surprised and initially saddened by the 2010 and 2011 departures of Stapleton and Henderson. But the entries of Nichols and virtuoso mandolin talent Truitt have created a SteelDrivers band that carries the gutbucket ethic of the original combo, but pleases in different ways.

    Nichols, who initially felt an obligation to replicate Stapleton’s mighty vocal turns, emerged as a vocalist of distinction, as a monster acoustic guitarist and as a songwriting force who wrote or co-wrote five of Shoals Recordings’ 11 songs. Rogers stepped up her songwriting as well, and she has credits on all but one of the album’s remaining songs. The one outlier on The Muscle Shoals Recordings is “Drinkin’ Alone,” a romp penned by Jay Knowles and former SteelDriver Stapleton. Wait, check that…

    “Chris Stapleton and Mike Henderson will always be SteelDrivers,” Rogers says. “They aren’t in the band playing shows, but they are part of our sound, and part of our story.”

    Truitt’s fluid mandolin added another virtuoso element to a group that is undergirded by Fleming’s upright bass and baritone harmonies.

    “Mike is responsible for a lot of the emotion of the songs,” Nichols says. “He stands out more on this record vocally than he ever did before, and as a bass player he’s a big part of our sound. We don’t have a drummer, so he and I have to be the kick, snare, and high hat. He’s the backbone; I’m the hips.”

    That’s not to say that this is all about swagger and sway. These Muscle Shoals Recordings hold much in the way of plaintive beauty. “Here She Goes,” written by Nichols and Dylan LeBlanc, is songwriting at its most honest—no posturing and no fronts. It’s a song about divorce, without blame: “If I were honest, I’d say she stayed too long,” Nichols sings, to a soundtrack aided by Jason Isbell, Nichols’ childhood friend and musical partner, who co-produced the track (and “Brother John”).

    In the studio, the band kept pushing the tempo, perhaps to assuage the sadness and, perhaps, because it’s sometimes easier for master musicians to play with reckless abandon than with somber certainty. “After we played it through, I spoke up and said, ‘Maybe it needs to be a bit faster,’” Rogers says. “Jason said, ‘Well, maybe we can just try harder.’ He was right, and we tried harder.”Nichols and Isbell played together as teens when Nichols fronted Gulliver, a band that included bass man Jimbo Hart and drummer Ryan Tillery. When Nichols scored a major label deal with Mercury Records in 2006, he hit the road with Hart and Tillery. When Nichols exited Mercury, Hart and Tillery joined Isbell’s 400 Unit band.

    Way back then, Gulliver worked with Jimmy Nutt, upon whose studio the SteelDrivers converged in late 2014 to make an uncommon and instantly identifiable album. Nutt cut his teeth at Rick Hall’s FAME studios, and Hall is the guy who produced “You Better Move On,” “Fancy,” “Slip Away,” and, come to think of it, Wilson Pickett’s “Mustang Sally.” All that stuff is supposed to be a world removed from Nashville, from bluegrass, from banjos and mandolins. But the SteelDrivers place it all in close proximity. They make music born of collisions of traditions, from meldings of things assumed un-meldable.

    “This stuff is all related,” Nichols says. “The note selection, the melodies, and the licks are the same. It’s just a different accent.” Nichols and the SteelDrivers speak in their own accent, one that charms and sears and beguiles. This is a band like no other, by inclination but not by calculation. Nichols, Rogers, Bailey, Fleming, Truitt … Those of us who have listened all know where their souls are bound. Bound to triumph. Bound to rise. Bound to matter. Bound to resound. Bound to impact. Bound to roar and shimmy, to howl and heal. A damn good band, this one. If you don’t believe it, start around two minutes and ten seconds into “Long Way Down.” That’s the stuff, right there.

    The SteelDrivers Official Website

     

    The Josh Daniel/Mark Schimick Project

     

     

    Formed in early 2014, The Josh Daniel/Mark Schimick Project is a fiery string band blending bluegrass, soul, reggae and rock n’ roll into a style uniquely their own. Respecting their Appalachian roots, these passionate multi-instrumentalists have a way of blending their harmonies and intricate string work in to something that appeals to a wide variety of listeners. “A little of everything finds its way into their sound.” – Jim Lauderdale

    In February, the band was asked to celebrate the grand opening of The Earl Scruggs Museum in Shelby, NC, playing alongside Sam Bush and The Steep Canyon Rangers. By Spring, the band had made even more notable appearances, invited to the stage by Al Schiner of moe. to play a few songs as well as a surprise appearance at Merlefest where they brought the crowd to their feet with a tribute to Doc Watson.

    Josh (Charlotte, NC) and Mark (Asheville, NC) have been fixtures on the Americana circuit for years, Josh with The New Familiars and Mark with Larry Keel and Natural Bridge. Together, with upright bassist, Greg Howell (Outer Banks, NC) the trio recorded an album in Nashville with grammy nominee, Jonathan Crone and features guests Jim Van Cleave (Mountain Heart), Megan McCormick (Jenny Lewis/Everybodyfields), Reeve Coobs and Jim Brock. While in Nashville, the band was featured on Music City Roots playing a sold out show with Hayes Carl closing the night out with Josh, Mark and Hayes trading verses on The Meters “Hey Pocky Way” in honor of Mardi Gras!

    Josh Daniel/Mark Schimick Project Official Website

     

    BlacKingCoal

    BlackKing CoalAmerican music. What is it? It's everything. It's everywhere. It's all of us. The very fabric of life in America is infused with every style of music that has been born, or at the very least, transformed, within these majestic hills, valleys, mountains, hollers, plains and rolling beauty. The blues. From the country to the city. Country. From the back hollers of WV to the mountains of Arkansas. Bluegrass. From old Kentucky to California. Rock and Roll. From all of that which came before. America. Pure and simple and undeniable. BlacKingCoal filters it through the coalfields and backwoods of West Virginia and then just throws it up in the air to see where it lands. Dirty blues. Bluegrass with a swing or growl. Country with a yell. Whatever. It's all just music. It has one purpose. To make you smile, jump up, clap, stomp and yell. Hopefully, if we do it right, all at once. Comprised of former and current members of Rust Kings and The Wild Rumpus and led by Allan Dale Sizemore, BlacKingCoal is well versed in American music. Having played festivals as diverse as Merlefest, The John Hartford Festival, The Lowell Folk Festival and Brew Skies as well as MANY others and every hole in the wall and kickin' nightclub from Maine to St. Louis, Michigan to Arkansas and all points in between, the members of BlacKingCoal have just about seen or done it all. And survived. Barely, at times. Clint "The Deacon" Lewis still lays the law down with his upright, "Handsome" Mike Zimmerman still keeps the pocket tight and Allan still dances all over the place with his guitar, growling, screaming and at times crooning like a dirty angel. Sometimes, other Kings will dance in and out of the circle, but it stays tight and loose at the same time. Allan's songs going from a 50s style rock and roll number to a country barroom to a city ballroom and back again, they all are tied together with a single rope. And sometimes, twine. American music.

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